My favorite tales

I sometimes forget that multiple sclerosis is a serious disease. And that things like the daily wearing of disposable underwear and typing with my left (non-dominant) hand were hard and demoralizing at first. They only became standard for me after I learned the new way I could do them. 
 
Once when I was feeling really sorry for myself I watched the movie The Bone Collector. I became enamored with the lead character who was completely paralyzed and bed-ridden, but discovered the he could still work as a detective. 
 
He found he needed a team to do his legwork, but that his brain was as sharp or maybe even sharper than ever (and did I mention that he’s played by Denzel Washington? Yummy!).
 
Additionally, every day he has to convince himself not to kill himself. Well really, that would’ve entailed convincing someone else to kill him or help him kill himself, which is probably illegal in his state.
 
Read the book
 
I bought the book and re-read the story. I wondered about the author and how he came to the story. What made him think of it? I don’t want to kill myself but it does make me think of the emotional battles I do often fight. 
 
It doesn’t comfort me to know that doctors now consider chronic depression, which is exponentially more common in MSers than in the general population, to actually be a symptom of our disease, a bug in our brain chemistry.
 
As an aside, one of my friends recently “exercised her right to die” in Oregon. She basically just stopped eating and drinking, and passed away peacefully several days later. So really if he wanted to really do it without help, he could have. But I digress…
 
Watched TV show
 
It has now been made into a weekly TV show. It shows on Friday nights which is, I think, a pretty dead time slot for television. It reflects the wishy-washy confidence of the network I guess.
 
I became fascinated with the workarounds that he found for himself. And in the end I thought if he can do it I can do it.
 
It was the first in my fascination with people who overcome or persist in spite of their disability. I collect the stories now, and revisit them when I’m blue. It reminds me that I have successfully persisted quite a bit!
 
What I’ve learned this week

Tagged : / / / / /

MS med makes cold worse?

I never get annual flu shots because I don’t want to help my immune system in any way. I’m at war with my immune system to a certain extent because it is at war with me.
 
So when I got this cold at first I kinda thought it was cute, because my immune system seems like such a bully.
 
But now three weeks into the monster cold — which I only call monster cold because I don’t usually get colds — it has lost its charm.
 
Seldom sick as a kid
 
I was never a very sickly child. I had chickenpox once, and mumps, which kept me out of school for the requisite time but I was not prone to getting regular colds.
 
As a young adult, I did occasionally catch whatever was going around, but was never down for more than a few days.
 
Once I was diagnosed with MS, though, I noticed how rarely now anything makes me sick. I assume that this is evidence that my immune system is superstrong and to be fought against as it is attacking me by misguided accident.
 
But now obviously my immune system is not in super mode.
 
Gilenya works
 
The fact that I got this cold suggests to me that the current MS med I’m taking is doing it’s job for me, thwarting my immune system by restraining lymphocytes from being released by my thyroid. (See previous post on Gilenya.)
 
However, it is driving me nuts not being able to speak. My laryngitis was so bad at one point: I had called customer support for my new HP laptop and it was voice-response only. It couldn’t figure out what I was asking for. Frustrating.
 
A friend gave me a bottle of Echinacea left over from when she was fighting a cold.  But it’s from 1997 and in small print on the side it says “Not recommended for individuals with auto-immune conditions.”
 
And while there is now some debate over whether MS is in fact an auto-immune disease, I prefer to err on the side of caution.
 
Does OTC negate it?
 
I’m not sure if avoiding taking any cold medication is the wiser decision here.
 
My doctor did advise me that “being on Gilenya doesn’t mean you can’t take symptomatic cold remedies.” But he also concedes that it is “(h)ard to relate this particular problem to Gilenya…”
 
So do I risk feeling better and maybe blocking the great work this drug is doing?
 
I think I’ll just go back to bed and think about this tomorrow!
 
Things I’ve learned this week
 
PNG image

Tagged : / / / / / /

MSer: Plan snacks

Waiting for my neighbor to deliver a plate of Thanksgiving day food, I pictured myself as a hungry baby bird, waiting with my mouth open and crying piteously.
 
Unfortunately, she was, at the same time, experiencing utter oven failure. With a house full of guests, doing their annual Thanksgiving day potluck, her oven had crapped out, and calling to tell me she would be late was, understandably, the last thing on her mind.
 
As I waited for her, I spiraled emotionally down, finally landing at full-on self-pity. I felt helpless, useless, needy, and ashamed.
 
When she finally arrived, flustered and apologetic, I muttered my abbreviated sob-story, burst into tears, and greedily ate the food she brought.
 
The moral of this story is that letting hunger overcome you is one recipe for the blues: you get weak, which leads to frustration, anger, and tears.
 
De-brief
 
What I should’ve done, for her and for me, is have a regular eating schedule, which includes well-planned snacks! 
 
I don’t know if this is relevant to all MSers, but I tend to not think about food until I am hangry. Those around me can tell when I’m overdue for food.
 
The National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD) has some great articles on eating (as well as on wheelchair exercise, and mental health, among others).
 
Helpful tips
 
This is what I gleaned this time:
 
  1. Eat every four hours, even at this holiday season, and snacks should always include one protein and one carbohydrate to keep up your energy.
  2. Watch portions. Snacks are smaller than meal portions. They shouldn’t “fill you up” but rather help you to be “not hungry.”
  3. Choose your snacks to contribute to your calorie and nutrient needs, rather than considering them as “extras.
  4. Limit yourself to a 100 calorie snack if your meal is in one hour or so (one hour = one hundred calories); two hours, have a 200-calorie snack.
  5. Don’t mix snacking with other activities. Snacking absentmindedly while multi-tasking can lead to overeating.
  6. Keep snacks on-hand at all times. Carry two tasty, nutritious, ready-to-eat snacks in your bag so you don’t run out. Always be prepared!
I could’ve just had some Cheerios with Almond milk in a bowl and sated myself. Sigh.
 
Some other quick, two-food snacks include peanut butter or cheese with apple slices, raw veggies and cottage cheese, or 10-12 baked tortilla chips and salsa.
 
I know this already, but still I hadn’t planned ahead. Once I hit famished, I could think of nothing helpful.
 
Lesson re-learned. 🙂
Like you need to be urged to eat snacks!
 
Other things I’ve learned this week
Tagged : / / / / /

43 hours without electricity

Or lessons I learned from the outage.
 
We lost power on Saturday night at 8 PM and it stayed off until Monday afternoon at 3 PM. 43 hours. Not anything like what other people have gone through, but disturbing nonetheless.
 
There were a few emails the day before, warning us that they would need to shut off electricity in advance of the powerful wind as a precaution. Given the recent, disastrous fires, it is easy to agree with the reasoning.
 
But really? Is this the best PG&E HQ could come up with in the two years since Paradise? I think this is a distressing lack of imagination! Even my cousin in Washington said “Somehow many other countries have figured out how to run the power lines underground. Perhaps they could draw us a little picture.”
 
OK, I do believe in climate change, both natural and man-made, but I also
living in Hayward and suffered through the Oakland Hills firestorm in 1991, so this is hardly a recent problem. If burying the lines was so expensive back then, we could’ve at least started saving then. Maybe had a bake sale? Just sayin’
 
The outage
 
We lost power on Saturday night at 8 PM and it stayed off until Monday afternoon at 3 PM. 43 hours. Not anything like what other people have gone through, but disturbing nonetheless.
 
With advance notice I was able to put fresh batteries in my flashlight and charge up my iPad and cell phone. In present day society, being able to text and listen to podcasts while the power is out is not a hardship. I was able to ration my battery accordingly.
 
Like camping
 
I am heat sensitive like many MSers but I do not use an Air conditioner at this time. Luckily if  I needed an air conditioner I could be driven to a local cooling station, for example. Usually in a community in crisis there are places that are running on a generator.
 
Another friend asked do you have a plan if you have to get out? Answer yes. In fact my husband keeps the gas tank in the truck above the half full level at all times, and has it already stocked with emergency supplies. So at a moments notice (well for me that’s more like 10 minutes!) we just have to get ourselves out the door and into the truck.
 
Debrief
 
Ultimately this could have been way worse. Clearly my exit plans rely on rely on friends and family to help me out of the house, or to drive me somewhere. I‘ll continue to mull exit options for the future, but I guess you never know what you don’t know until after the event.
 
So for the next power outage should get: hand crank radio, solar powered or battery-operated cell phone/iPad charger, maybe some cans of cold coffee and a battery operated fan?
 
Which makes me think of preparing for camping or a zombie apocalypse (digression: would zombies be a danger to me since I notice that mosquitos no longer will bite me now that I’m taking a DMT, probably my blood tastes bad to them, although that is anecdotal so could be applicable just to me…)
 
What I’ve learned this week
  • Hoarding is twice as common among people with MS versus the general population
  • Most of us have inherited some core limiting beliefs about money, like ‘Money doesn’t grow on trees’ or ‘Waste not, want not’ so changing your underlying programming is critically important in manifesting a different reality. Cairns, J. A. (2015). The abundance code
  • 30 days is a good length of time for developing a new habit. Scott, S. J. (2015). Exercise every day: 32 tactics for building the exercise habit (even if you hate working out).

Tagged : / / / /

Walking on sunshine

I’ve been using a wheelchair for the most recent fifteen years of my life. But curiously I’m always walking in my dreams!
 
In them I’m usually not at home. I’m usually walking around a building, a shopping center, a store. Even outside.
 
And it is only recently that I’ve started to occasionally notice that I’m holding a cane or crutch in my dreams. But I am still walking. 
 
When They Were Young
 
In my dreamscape, the wheelchair does not ever appear. It seems my brain knows it does not belong.(I wonder if someone who has been confined to a chair since birth appears moving that way in their dreams.)
 
I used to be proud of my long legs; now they get in the way a lot of the time. Still, I would not like to have them removed, so that’s something. Even as inconvenient as they can be, there’s always the chance that I’ll need them someday.
 
But I also used to consider my legs to be fat. I was ashamed that their was no space showing between my thighs, for example. Now that I’ve lost so much muscle, they’re definitely skinny, but not in a good way.  Be careful what you wish for!
 
Is Dreaming Visualization?
 
I’ve been reading about sports visualization. And I wonder if I can take advantage of the finding that your body experiences muscle movement whether it’s real or imagined. To rehearse what it would be like to walk again.
 
Since the brain does not distinguish between real and imagined actions (see here), does it count when I’m sleeping? Am I getting the experience of walking in my dreams? 
 
There are also new products that potentially would allow me to be more mobile, like using a lifeglider, for example.  Yes, I definitely would need legs for this!
 
Now
 
These days I spend most of my time indoors in a wheelchair.  I am reluctant to get overheated, to spend a lot of time outside in the sun, so I stay inside like a housebound vampire.
 
It is not really a hardship for me because I like to spend time alone, to think and read and learn. I enjoy research and I don’t miss hiking or yoga or Tai Chi outside. I don’t miss it but I wish I had the choice to go outside at a moments notice if I wanted to.
 
At this point I understand that I may never walk again. Unless a cure is found, or even a way to reverse the damage done to my myelin. 
 
But then again I see no harm in adding guided visualization about walking to my daily routine. 🙂
 
What I’ve learned this week 
  • Objects, as coins, tools, etc., used by a teacher to illustrate everyday living are called Realia plural noun [ree-ey-lee-uh, -al-ee-uh, rey-ah-lee-uh] 
  • Muscle memory is real
  • Get free online classes from prestigious schools like Yale 
  • One recommended place to get your prescription eyeglasses online for $15ish

Tagged : / / /

Too old for Gilenya?

In the Gilenya Facebook page we recently had a discussion about this article: Meta-analysis of the Age-Dependent Efficacy of Multiple Sclerosis Treatments
 
A meta-analysis in scientific thinking is a review of multiple previous studies to try and confirm a new hypothesis. In this case, whether the efficacy of MS drugs declines with the age of the patient and finally becomes ineffective.
 
MS Drugs
 
Drugs approved for MS are not drugs that can cure the disease. Nothing can cure the disease. We still don’t even know what causes it.
 
So the drugs approved for MS are basically drugs to halt progression of the disease. (And like I said, the cause of which is still unknown, so what halts the progression is still technically unknown.)
 
At this point there are so many DMT drugs for MS (17 to date) that attempt to work in many different ways. It can be a crapshoot.
 
But this article concludes that all DMT drugs that work on MS begin to decrease in efficacy after the age of 53. I wonder if this is why my doctor keeps asking me how old I am?
 
Are expensive
 
MS drugs, especially in this country, are exceedingly expensive. Not to mention the hundreds of others that aim to treat symptoms.
 
In one example, in 2004 the MS Society estimated that “the major drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for relapsing- remitting MS can cost between $10,000 and $14,000 a year.”
 
Given the news that the cost of prescription drugs in the U.S. is now the highest in the world. Can you imagine what our costs are today?
 
And are difficult to measure
 
And speaking as someone who now has entered the secondary progressive phase of the disease without active exacerbations, it is often hard to tell if the drug I’m taking makes a difference.
 
The only really accurate test we have is the MRI, which can show If there are newer lesions. The idea is that if there are newer lesions the drug that you’re taking is probably not working as its goal is to keep new lesions from forming.
 
But there have been no tests that show that new lesions have any correlation with symptoms. So does the appearance of new lesions on the MRI mean that the disease itself is advancing? Has being on this drug made any difference.
 
What I’m wondering
 
So here’s my dilemma. I have continued to decline over my lifetime.
 
And it is concerning to me that I keep paying x number of dollars to stay on this drug all while studies are showing that stopping it now might not hurt me.
 
On the other hand, other studies show that some people who stop it, even those that switch to something else, experience a major rebound exacerbation resulting in further decline from which I cannot recover.
 
And there is no way to tell in advance how I will respond.
 
Ergo, if I stop the drug based on these latest studies, I will never be able to get back to where I am now if I decline further after doing it.
 
I will be meeting with my neurologist next week and having a chat about this. Stay tuned.
 
Things I’ve learned this week
  • Nasturtium leaves, flowers and pods are all edible
  • Lede is a real word, as in “Way to bury the lede, Amy!” Apparently that’s the noun! I’ve been imagining that phrase wrong.
  • Weight-bearing describes a person who is able to carry their own weight with at least one leg
  • Three inputs to your brain for balance: sight, auditory (vestibular), and proprioception, which is the medical term that describes the ability to sense the orientation of your body in your environment
  • Maybe a picky eater is actually only picky about the method by which the food is prepared
  • Inspiration porn example: ‘He asked her to the prom even though she has Down’s syndrome.’ But should be just like it’s not cool if you say ‘He asked her to the prom even though she is Asian.’
Tagged : / / / / /

Isn’t investing gambling?

It is understandable that we MSers, facing exceptional circumstances, want to protect any money we make from being squandered.
 
Our medications and healthcare costs are astronomical. Also, as a population, we physically may be forced to retire prematurely.
 
Like the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) says “Knowing how to secure your financial well-being is one of the most important things you’ll ever need in life.” 
 
This is especially true for us.
 
The MSer’s finances
 
Traditionally banks paid enough interest to make just saving what we could until retirement prudent. Unfortunately, not anymore.
 
How “safe” is a savings account if you leave all your money there for your working life, but the interest it earns doesn’t keep up with inflation when you are no longer working and need it?
 
This is why many people keep some of their money in savings, but look to investing to amplify their other money. For most people, the only way to attain financial security is both to save and invest over a long period of time. 
 
Generating vs. earning
 
I suggest we think about our finances as needing to generate income rather then simply earning it. Viewing it in terms of generating an income “takes the power out of (the provider’s) hands and places it into your own.”
 
It reminds us that we still have a lot of control over our future, maybe even more than this disease does.
 
I work hard for my money. It makes sense that my money should be working for me, too.  Why should investing be only considered the playground for the wealthy?
 
I resolve that it shouldn’t be. And for those of us in the U.S. with chronic disease, who live in this capitalist society, it is even more imperative.
 
Isn’t it gambling?
 
Well OK, yes and no.
 
For example, my clutter is gambling: 
“I purchased bargains with potential usefulness. I bought things as a gamble. I gambled on the chance that one day, my dreams would come true. I would turn into the kind of person who mended expensive but damaged clothing. I would be the tinkerer who repaired a lamp that made guests gasp in delight…(But) an amazing bargain that ultimately makes my life more difficult isn’t an amazing bargain at all.”
from Dana White’s book Decluttering at the Speed of Life
 
So is playing baseball:  “You can’t steal second base and keep your foot on first.” (Frederick B. Wilcox)
 
Thus I guess that investing is gambling too, but it’s risk that can and should be mitigated.  (You should never risk more than you can lose and still be okay.)
 
So “learn to earn”
 
While we probably aren’t born knowing how to invest, I think everyone should learn at least the basics.
 
Visit the SEC website. If you are still working, take advantage of webinars, podcasts and classes offered by your 401k provider. Be careful about the sources of your info, but you can teach yourself.
 
And ask for help if you’re scared. The MS Society offers free or low-cost consultations with experts
Tagged : / / / / / / /

MS and hot cocoa

Hey, did you read the article that hot cocoa made with high-flavonoid chocolate could ease MS fatigue? I have MS fatigue. I like cocoa. This sounds like a recipe for an informal experiment!
 
The headline of the article I read is Daily Cup of Flavonoid-rich Cocoa May Help Ease MS Fatigue. It details a small trial of 40 MSers, half daily drinking high-flavonoid cocoa made with rice-milk and half drinking low-flavonoid cocoa. (Was the choice of rice-milk just a nod to food allergies?)
 
Fatigue was measured by a quality-of-life self-report, and fatigability was measured by a six-minute walk test (i.e., how far could a user walk in six minutes).
 
The trial concluded that the high-flavonoid cocoa was not only linked to heart and gut health but may “improve fatigue and fatigability” in MS.
 
What is a Flavanoid?
 
They are a type of plant-based antioxidant that occurs naturally in fruits, vegetables, wine, and tea, and are responsible for the vivid colors found in produce, for example. Studies have suggested that flavonoids have anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective benefits.
 
One place they are found is in cocoa beans. Usually the cacao tree produces the beans that are then roasted and ground into a paste called the cocoa solids. 
 
Thus, cocoa solids are a good source of flavonoids and the percentage of solids in the product should be listed on the side of a package. You can use this number as a general guide for choosing chocolate made with the highest concentration of solids. 
 
Unsweetened cocoa powder has 88 to 96 percent cocoa solids, for example. Dark chocolate contains 45 to 80 percent, and milk chocolate has only 5 to 7 percent, as the solids are “watered down” with sugar and milk. White chocolate doesn’t contain any.
 
(Was low-flavonoid cocoa achieved by replacing solids with “artificial flavors”?)
 
What about Heat?
 
As cozy as a cup of hot dark chocolate cocoa before bed sounds, it probably isn’t the optimal way to get your flavonoids. According to researchers, boiling causes the highest loss of antioxidants in vegetables, for example.
 
The length of time you expose foods to heat can significantly impact the antioxidant content. 
 
And imagine the roasting process by which the cocoa bean is converted to a cocoa solid. Although roasting is considered a “dry cooking method” and one of the best ways to retain nutrients, it may be reducing antioxident content by as much as 60%.
 
This shouldn’t matter much to us, as the cocoa we buy in the stores has the solids number on the label. But then again, researchers have discovered in some studies that the labeled cocoa content of the chocolate did not always reflect analyzed levels of flavonoids. Sigh.
 
Bottom line
 
This was a small study; more research is needed of course. But it seems like a thing that would definitely qualify for a go.fund.me effort. Hot cocoa is pretty much universally liked.
 
If you don’t like dark-chocolate cocoa, a square from a dark chocolate bar upon waking seems like it would help. If you want a higher flavonoid count, try making your own cocoa with unsweetened cocoa powder.
 
Maybe it is just a quality-of-life thing. Having a cup of cocoa every day makes you happy. We deserve that. 
 
And even if you only drink milk-chocolate cocoa, as long as there are some solids in it, you are getting a few flavonoids. 🙂
Tagged : / / / / /

Genial Gilenya

I am now taking the oral medication Gilenya (fingolimod). It was first synthesized in Japan in 1992 by chemical manipulation of a naturally occurring antibiotic, and finally approved by the FDA in 2010 as “the world’s first oral MS drug“. 
 
I call it genial because compared to giving myself daily shots, it is just a daily pill I swallow. But “genial” by no means suggests benign. This drug is as toxic as everything else I have tried. Incidences of PML occurring in people taking Gilenya do happen.
 
This Method
 
Everyone’s immune system contains lymph nodes, which are tiny glands containing immune cells (AKA white blood cells) called lymphocytes. Lymphocytes are usually helpful, but in MS they get confused and attack the central nervous system (CNS), and permanently damage the myelin sheath.
 
Gilenya activates sensors on your lymph nodes to restrain some white blood cells. That way, these blood cells aren’t released into the bloodstream, where they can attack. (Other lymphocytes are still circulating and available to do their job, watching out for intruders like viruses and bacteria.)
 
It also activates sensors on your heart, which can cause your heart rate to temporarily slow down. So it is recommended that all users be monitored by a medical professional for at least six hours after the first dose.
 
My Experience
 
I have been taking Gilenya since April 2012. This is from an earlier blog post:
 
…I packed my backpack with items to stave off the boredom of sitting around that long: two books I am currently reading [one fiction and one non-fiction], a book of Sudoku puzzles [I’m addicted!], lip balm…
 
We also brought a cooler with yogurt, granola bars, and sandwiches.  [My husband] brought a fingertip pulse oximeter so I could check my pulse regularly on my own.
 
In the end, the whole experience was pretty anti-climactic, which is probably the best-case scenario, really.  I read one book the entire time, and they let us leave before the rush hour started.
 
It was a record heat in SF, which lent the whole outing a surreal feel, and now that I’m onto Day Five, it is like it never happened…
 
It’s now been 6 years and I have tolerated it fine, but it has not made any amazing difference, as I had secretly wished. 
 
Things I’ve Learned
 
Gilenya might increase your risk of skin cancer. It can render a “live” vaccine inert while using it. And it can interact with a multitude of drugs, including vitamins, and herbal products.
 
It is rare but macular edema (a correctable eye condition causing swelling and blurry vision) may occur within the first 3-4 months of starting. It may be confused with an MS exacerbation, so check with your doctor, and consider annual ophthalmology appointments.
 
Finally, I have started to see reports about a “rebound relapse” phenomenon when users go off it. Obviously, once you go off, you should expect that the “door” of all lymph nodes is no longer being guarded so you most likely will resume MS where you left off.
 
But in about 25% of patients, there is an even more aggressive worsening of MS after stopping and these patients “do not return to the level of function that they had before or during treatment“. This worsening most often happens within 12 weeks of stopping. It is definitely something to consider before you start if you think you will want to go off it to get pregnant, for example.
 
Other stuff

Tagged : / / / / / / /

More feed yourself

I feel like I just got comfortable with having salad for lunch every day in a wrap. But it’s so cold now! (Ha, OK: February in San Francisco!)
 
Because I still don’t think of vegetables first when hungry, stuff like this is pleasantly surprising. Like I’ve said (and I shouldn’t be so surprised) I have found eating vegetables every day makes a big difference in my energy.
 
So I decided to switch for awhile from lettuce to spinach that I can eat warm. Thus I can still cross ‘eat leafy greens daily’ off my to-do list.
 
Leafy Greens
 
Now in my mini kitchen (think small fridge with smaller freezer compartment, electric kettle, and a microwave), I keep a bag of frozen spinach.  In the simplest feat, I heat it up and pour bottled peanut sauce on it. Delicious, quick and easy. 
 
Another quick way to use frozen spinach is to toss it into canned soup. Again, no prep. 
 
I imagine you can buy other dark greens like Brussels sprouts, chard, or bok choy already prepped in the freezer section as well. In fact, I have a friend who gets her kale that way which avoids prep for those with limited hand dexterity or a limited kitchen!
 
Sweet Potatoes
 
My other healthy quick go-to lately is sweet potatoes. I wipe them clean with a wet paper towel, prick several times with a fork, then pop in the microwave for two minutes or more. When done I retrieve and just start eating, skin and all. 
 
“Sweet potatoes are one of the healthiest foods known,” according to some health and wellness gurus. “The skins of sweet potatoes contain a number of additional nutrients, so it is beneficial to eat your sweet potato with the skin.”
 
It’s a great hand warmer too.
 
Whole Grains 
 
I also have oatmeal every morning with walnuts and dried cranberries.
 
“Although oatmeal is nutritious, adding other toppings to your oatmeal will balance out your breakfast,” say gurus again. “Stirring dried cranberries and chopped walnuts into your daily oatmeal will add fruit and lean protein — the walnuts — to your breakfast.”
 
Instead of buying those little packets, I just get the regular canisters of oatmeal, then use an old plastic pudding cup container (light weight, plus portion control) to parcel out the morning’s amount, and add a handful each of walnuts and dried cranberries. 
 
I sprinkle on some coconut sugar (lower glycemic impact), heat water to boiling in my electric kettle, add it and cover the bowl and let it sit for a few minutes. Serving of nuts crossed off the list.
 
Eating like this crosses things off my daily to-do list: veggies, nuts and whole grains. Check!

Tagged : / / / / /